The Unemployed Journalist

“It’s a terrible thing, I think, in life to wait until you’re ready. I have this feeling now that actually no one is ever ready to do anything. There is almost no such thing as ready. There is only now. And you may as well do it now. Generally speaking, now is as good a time as any.”

– Hugh Laurie (via hello-goat-lips)

fieldbears:

lydiduh:

In 15 seconds of dialogue Francis Wilkerson sums up what’s wrong with how women are criticized in our society and it’s great

I literally remember when this aired and something clicked in my head. He was putting to words what I kept seeing over and over in media without apology or explanation

lostdreamer19:

a-massacre-of-corvines:

eloarei:

My awesomest Christmas present this year, a preserved gold-dipped rose. If this isn’t Beauty and the Beast, I don’t know what is.

is that. a real. rose. preserevd in stuff.

is THAT. a REAL ROSE, preserved. IN STUFF.???

It’s called a Forever Rose. Look it up on Google. There’s a website for them !!!

newyorker:

Marina Harss on the ballerina Wendy Whelan, who will retire from New York City Ballet on Saturday night:

"At forty-seven, she seems to care less about how things look than about the way they work and what they say. There’s a kind of no-bull attitude to her dancing that cuts through the posturing and the ornamentation that can sometimes be off-putting about ballet."

Photograph by Beatrice de Gea/The New York Times/Redux

newyorker:

Marina Harss on the ballerina Wendy Whelan, who will retire from New York City Ballet on Saturday night:

"At forty-seven, she seems to care less about how things look than about the way they work and what they say. There’s a kind of no-bull attitude to her dancing that cuts through the posturing and the ornamentation that can sometimes be off-putting about ballet."

Photograph by Beatrice de Gea/The New York Times/Redux

“For as long as there’s been a mainstream feminist movement, there have been corporations eager to capitalize on women’s desire for empowerment. And simply saying men and women should be treated equally isn’t the slightest bit risky in an era when the economy demands that nearly all women work outside the home and the biggest pop stars in America embrace the term feminist. But empowerment conferences are less a product of this friendly brand of modern feminism than they are the result of changing media business models and the rise of superficial corporate do-gooderism. Consumers are so wary of traditional advertising that one of the only ways for brands to make an end-run around skepticism is to claim, “Hey, we’re doing some good here.” As Unilever has learned with all the free press its “body-positive” Dove ads have gotten, women’s empowerment is a great theme for conscientious advertising — Bitch Magazine co-founder Andi Zeisler calls it “empowertising.” You-go-girl ads appeal to a broad demographic, but unlike championing, say, stricter environmental regulation, they put the onus for change on women themselves, not corporations or society.”

What Good Is a ‘Powerful Women’ Conference? - NYmag.com (via annfriedman)